Old school v new school CEOs – which are more likely to have a decent personal brand?

I make no secret of the fact I believe too many CEOs are ignoring the ‘elephant in the room’, social media presence – and need to work on their personal branding. If I had a pound (£), for every poor attempt at a LinkedIn profile by a CEO I find – I could make that a full-time job and do nothing else!

Actually, ‘attempt’ is being too kind – they resort to the minimum – name, rank and number. When I ask many of them why they haven’t added detail to their profiles or at least try and make themselves seem interesting – the excuses I’m given are more akin to when a teacher asks you why you didn’t do your homework. To be honest it’s embarrassing. Not just to them but to me too, having to review such poor work – people entrusted with the future of a business and the careers and wellbeing of their employees – are cheating.

Is that harsh? Not at all. When I played football (soccer) if a player was ‘cheating’ it meant they weren’t putting in a decent shift, they were being lazy and doing the bare minimum.

I recently found 92% out of 175 ‘active’ LinkedIn profiles, I reviewed, of CEOs from businesses with in excess of 10,000 employees – were, and I’m being kind, very poor. You would probably think that new school CEOs were the 8% that had made the effort – alas, that’s not the case. They are as bad as each other. ‘New school’ tend to think they have a decent personal brand but don’t, whereas ‘old school’ are more likely to make the changes required and are more open to help once they understand the impact. However, with CMOs also failing, you can understand how deep the problem goes.

Regardless of who’s best – it’s a shocking statistic and if I reviewed more profiles, the numbers could be worse. Makes you wonder what happens in the board meetings……….

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